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The Kings of Angle and their descendents
« : 01 Июнь 2009, 18:04:53 »
The Kings of Angle and their descendents    


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Y-DNA Findings

Genetic density studies are in amazing harmony with historical accounts.  The I1a (now I1, 2008) density map developed by the Scandinavian Y-DNA Project shows that the I1a haplogroup formed after the migration of Balkan tribes to Scandinavia.  Density is highest at Zealand, spreading along coastal areas of the Netherlands, Belgium, France and Spain.  In addition, we find the highest density in the UK at northern Scotland, with a declining gradient to the south. 

In addition we find several interesting high density pockets.  These pockets are prominent because they are not natural extensions of the I1a gradient that originates at Zealand, Denmark.  Instead, it is quite obvious that several significant migrations occurred to more distant locations.  While researching these locations, we find that these I1a hot spots map to the following places:


   1. Kiev
   2. The confluence of the Volga and Oka rivers
   3. The confluence of the Danube and the Timok River

The first two locations map directly to the exploits of the Kievan Rus.  Kiev was the center of power for the Rus.  The second location was captured by the Rus during a campaign in 966.  The Rus are named for the word Rhos or Rus, which has the meaning of moorland, heathland or brushwood.  This is the same word used to name the domain of Rorik of Dorestad called Rustringen in Frisia.  Rus-tringen has the meaning “ring on the brushwood/ heath/ moor.”  Rustringen is no doubt named in honor of the ring fort at Hedeby (meaning field of heather), which was home to the kings of Angle.

The Rus army that went with Rorik is likely to have included participants from both Angle (Hedeby) and Frisia (Rustringen).  Most scholars believe Rorik is the son of either Anulo or Hemming.  Thus he is either the brother or first cousin of Ragnar.  I suspect that Rorik was the brother of Ragnar.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raven_banner

http://www.theangles.org/


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Re: The Kings of Angle and their descendents
« Ответ #1 : 01 Июнь 2009, 18:13:01 »


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Descendents of the Kings of Angle

This research team is exploring the lives and times, ancestry and descendents of a branch of the Danish royal family that were the Kings of Angle. The team is particularly interested in the king named Hring (aka Anulo) who is probably named for the ring (Latin Curvus) fort that stood at Hedeby. Key symbols of Heidabyr include the raven (Latin Corvus) and the Hart, Stag (Latin Cervus).

The family is best known for rule established over the cultural ancestral region of Angeln, a modern district located in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany that included the market town of Hedeby. The family also established rule over Frisia, including the important region of Rustringen.

Crispin is one of the most ancient family names adopted by their descendents. Variations include Krause (German), Freskin (Frisian), Crispin (Latin) and Friser (French). Crispin derives from the meaning of "curly," which pertains to the semi-circular fort at Hedeby that curls in a crescent shape.

The subject family was also known for the many powerful Sea-Kings, including Ragnar, Hasting and their sons. The family is also noted for the Danelaw established in England, including the Kingdom of Northumbria and Kingdom of East Anglia, and the lands of the Five Boroughs of Leicester, Nottingham, Derby, Stamford and Lincoln. The family is also known for uniting Scandinavia under Harald Blatand, for the role played in the formation of Flanders and Normandy, and for influence and rule in Brittany, Maine and Anjou.

Tremendous discoveries have been made since this group was launched. As Crispin cousins, we are on a journey of discovery involving one of the most influential families in the histories of Central Europe, Denmark, Germany, Flanders, Normandy, Spain, England, Italy and many other locations.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/crispincousins/


Location of the Angles, Saxons and Jutes before their migrations to Britain. Note that borders fluctuated with the fortunes of war, in particular that between the Angles and Jutes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_kings_of_the_Angles
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angles
« Последнее редактирование: 08 Июнь 2009, 01:21:54 от Аббат Бузони »

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Re: The Kings of Angle and their descendents
« Ответ #2 : 05 Июнь 2009, 02:28:29 »
Очень интересная статья про происхождение 2-х шотландских семей - Брюсов и Сент Клеров от викингов (м.б. I1).

http://www.byalko.ru/priroda_10-08.pdf

Кстати, я хотел спросить, Гамильтоны в известных представителях - это потомки натуральных гамильтонов -или потомки по женской линии от брака с Дугласами?

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Re: The Kings of Angle and their descendents
« Ответ #3 : 05 Июнь 2009, 09:22:36 »
Натуральные Гамильтоны, хотя действительно есть и Гамильтоны из Дугласов. На дереве, которое я строил у Гамильтонов выделилось 3 куста. Один куст это исключительно Гамильтоны, второй Гамильтоны-Дугласы, третий Гамильтоны-Гаррисы.

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Re: The Kings of Angle and their descendents
« Ответ #4 : 17 Июнь 2009, 09:03:37 »
Флёр-де-Лис (фр. fleur de lys или fleur de lis, дословно «цветок лилии», или лилия, или королевская лилия) — гербовая фигура, четвёртая по популярности среди естественных геральдических символов после креста, орла и льва.

Во Франции.
По французской легенде, Хлодвиг, меровингский король франков, обратился в 496 г. н. э. в христианство, после чего ангел дал ему золотую лилию в знак его очищения.
В другом варианте легенды утверждается, что Хлодвиг взял себе в качестве эмблемы лилию после того, как водяные лилии в Рейне подсказали ему безопасное место, где можно перейти реку вброд, благодаря чему он одержал победу в битве.

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Re: The Kings of Angle and their descendents
« Ответ #5 : 17 Июнь 2009, 09:08:44 »
Майкл Гаррис выдвинул версию, что носители флер-де-лис могут быть представителями гаплогруппы I1.

Вопрос. Можно ли локализовать древнейших носителей этого знака?

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Re: The Kings of Angle and their descendents
« Ответ #6 : 27 Август 2009, 22:45:00 »
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Kings & Queens of Sweden

Olof Sk?tkonung (980-1022) => H5a (mtDNA)
Birger jarl (1210-1266) = > I1a (Y-DNA) (new)
Valdemar (1240-1302) = > I1a (Y-DNA) (new)
Magnus III (Magnus Ladul?s) (1240-1290) = > I1a (Y-DNA) (new)

Christian I (1426-1481) => R1b (Y-DNA)
John (1455-1513) => R1b (Y-DNA)
Christian II (1481-1559) => R1b (Y-DNA)
Gustav II Adolf (1594-1632) => T2 (mtDNA)
Charles X Gustav (1622-1660) => T2 (mtDNA)
Christina of Sweden (1626-1689) => H (mtDNA)
Margaret of Connaught (1882-1920) => H (mtDNA)
Louise Mountbatten (1889-1965) => H (mtDNA)
Ingrid (1910-2000) => H (mtDNA)
Carl XVI Gustaf (1946-) => H (mtDNA)

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Re: The Kings of Angle and their descendents
« Ответ #7 : 27 Август 2009, 23:17:13 »
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Ever since I heard of Birger Jarl?s l tomb was going to be opened I have been rather curious about what they would find out. There was a press conference (2007) were they confirmed that it was really Birger Jarl, his wife and son in the grave. The results are below. But they never mentioned anything about his haplogroup or any more revealing information about the grave and the buried family. A little more was revealed in a pressnotice later.

So I called up Andreas Carlsson today at The National Board of Forensic Medicine and asked him. He revealed that Birger Jarl was haplo I1a, the most common haplogroup in Sweden. The investigation has now stopped because there are no living descendants to Birger jarl today. At least that is what they think.....The line back in time is also hard to trace.

The haplogroup of Birger jarl has not been published in public before.

Birger jarl, born Birger Magnusson (c. 1210 – 21 October 1266), was a Swedish statesman, a member of the House of Bjelbo, who played a pivotal role in the consolidation of Sweden while a jarl from 1248 until his death. In addition, he is traditionally attributed to have founded the Swedish capital, Stockholm, around 1250, and several historical structures there are still named after him — including the street Birger Jarlsgatan (on Norrmalm); the tower Birger Jarls Torn and the square Birger Jarls Torg (both on Riddarholmen).

It is known that Birger grew up and spent his adolescence in Bj?lbo, ?sterg?tland but the exact date of his birth remains uncertain and available historical sources are contradictory. Examinations of his mortal remains indicate that he was probably about 50 upon his death in 1266 which would indicate a birth around 1216. However, his father Magnus Minnesk?ld is assumed to have died no later than 1210, which would lead to an assumed birth a few years earlier. Under any circumstance, he was the son of Ingrid Ylva, mentioned as the daughter of Sune Sik, the son of Sverker the Elder, which made Birger a member of the House of Sverker. His brothers or half-brothers — Eskil, Karl, and Bengt — were all born long before 1200, and it can therefore be assumed that they had another mother. He was also a nephew of the jarl Birger Brosa from the House of Bjelbo. The combination of this background proved to be of vital importance.

Birger, thus most likely born at the time for the Battle of Gestilren in 1210 and named after Birger Brosa, one of the most potent men of the era who died in 1202, started his career in the mid 1230s by marrying the king's sister Ingeborg Eriksdotter, according to the Eric's Chronicle in fierce rivalry with other suitors.

During the 15 years to follow, Birger then consolidated his position and was probably one of the most influential men years before being formally given the title jarl in 1248 by King Eric XI. Birger was later claimed to have been responsible for amilitary campaign against the Novgorod Republic that Russians claim ended in a defeat by Alexander Nevsky during a battle the Russians refer to as Neva Battle in 1240. While Swedish, German, Finnish, Baltic and other sources have no information on the battle at all, a 16th century Russian legend tells that the Swedish "king" was wounded in the face while dueling against Prince Alexander Nevsky himself.

Although Birger Jarl saw many battles, some have speculated that traces of a sword blow in Birger's cranium might have originated from this battle (or any of the many others). However, the original 14th century Russian version of the battle had no information on this at all.

When the papal diplomat William of Modena visited present Sweden around 1248, he urged the Swedish kings to fulfill the rules of the Catholic Church, an exhortation which Birger seem to have taken as a chance to strengthen his position by simply taking the side of the church against other members of his family (alternatively possible to interpret as a manifestation of his pious side). This was a choice of historical importance as it was to make Birger a jarl powerful enough to ultimately wind up the office, thus making him the last Swedish jarl ever, even called as the "first true king of Sweden" by historians. As this happened during an era when the inherited concept Folkung became more of a political party, it also meant Swedish magnates lost most of their influence which paved the way for a consolidated Swedish kingdom supported by the Pope.

In 1249, Birger succeeded in ending a decades-long period of hostilities with Norway. As a part of the Treaty of L?d?se, he also managed to marry off his daughter Rikissa, then only 11-years old, to the eldest son of the King of Norway. Presumably later that year, Birger led an expedition to Finland, later dubbed as the Second Swedish Crusade, which permanently established the Swedish rule in Finland. On King Eric's death in 1250, Birger's son Valdemar was elected as the new king while Birger acted as regent, holding the true power in Sweden until his death.

In 1252, a year after the victory over the folkungs at the Battle of Herrevadsbro, Birger wrote two carefully dated letters, the first mention of Stockholm interpreted as the foundation of the city or at least some sort of special interest in the location. Neither of the letters give a description of the location, however, and while archaeological traces of older defensive structures have been found there, what did exist on the premises before the mid 13th century remains debated. It has been suggested Birger chose the location for several reasons: Partly to curb domestic magnates by isolating them with a "lock of Lake M?laren", offering a defense to the lands around M?laren from invading enemies in the process; and to create a commercial bridgehead to attract German merchants. While Birger's direct involvement in the foundation of the city remains speculative, it probably was no accident it was founded on the location at this time, as there were alternative passages into M?laren during the preceding Viking Era; as Crusades, a kind of Viking raids in a Christian disguise, had proven increasingly unsuccessful; and as taking control over the location, traditionally where men supposedly gathered before the ledung, meant old offensive military traditions could be replaced by more "modern" commercial efforts directed towards L?beck. Birger thus combined financial support from Germany with papal political support to consolidate his own position.[8]
The grave of Birger jarl, his wife Mechtild and Birger's son Duke Erik.

Late life

Ingeborg died in 1254 and in 1261 Birger married the widow of King Abel of Denmark, the queen dowager Mechtild of Holstein. Birger died on 21 October 1266, at J?lbolung in V?sterg?tland. His grave at the Church of Varnhem was opened in May 2002.

There is a statue of the great earl in the Riddarholm Church in Stockholm, erected by Fogelberg at the expense of the Over-Governor of Stockholm in 1854, and there is a cenotaph for him at the base of the tower of Stockholm City Hall (it was originally intended that his remains be removed there, but this was never done). He is also the central figure of Fr. Hedberg's drama Br?llopet p? Ulf?sa (1865).

Children

Mother unknown

1. Gregers Birgersson

From marriage with Ingeborg Eriksdotter of Sweden

The marriage was contracted relatively near the time when Ingeborg's brother the once-deposed Eric XI returned from exile in Denmark in 1234.

1. Rikissa Birgersdotter, born 1238, married firstly 1251 Haakon Haakonson, co-king of Norway, and secondly, Henry I, Prince of Werle
2. Valdemar Birgersson, born c 1238, king of Sweden 1250–1275, lord of parts of Gothenland until 1278
3. Christina Birgersdotter, married presumably several times, one of her husbands was lord Sigge Guttormsson
4. Magnus Birgersson, born 1240, Duke (of S?dermanland), then king of Sweden 1275
5. probably: Catherine of Sweden, born 1245, married Siegfried, Count of Anhalt
6. Eric Birgersson, born 1250, Duke (of Sm?land)
7. probably: Ingeborg of Sweden, born ca. 1254, died 1302, married John I of Saxony, Duke of Lauenburg
8. Benedict, Duke of Finland, born 1254, bishop of Link?ping

With Mechtild (doubtful)

1. Christine Birgersdotter

http://www.uu.se/nyheter/nyhet.php?id=168&typ=artikel

From 2007.

Translated:

DNA analysis provides support for the hypothesis Birger Jarls grave

In collaboration with the V?sterg?tland Museum and R?ttsmedicinalverket shows researchers from Uppsala University that DNA analysis supports the hypothesis that Birger Jarl buried with his second wife and his son. The results were published today, Wednesday, at a press conference in Varnhem abbey.

In May 2002 opened the grave in Varnhem abbey in V?sterg?tland considered to contain the remains of Birger Jarl. The aim was to make a careful examination of the bones from the 1200-century and modern osteologiska analytical testing on the link to Birger Jarl, his wife, Mechtild, and son Erik was credible. Historically known data, together with the results from benanalyserna, is the basis for interpretation. Now this hypothesis supported by studies of the latest DNA technology was carried out by, among others, Anders G?therstr?m and student Helena Malmstr?m, Uppsala University Evolutionary Biology department.

Erik was the son of Birger, but Mechtild was not the mother of Erik. DNA from the medieval bones also show clearly that the three persons in the tomb did not have the same mother, or belonged to the same line MATERNAL. However, there appears to be a paternity relationship between the older and younger man in the grave. The remains identification is not possible to determine, as we do not know of any relatives to compare DNA with.

The research group has worked with several different types of DNA, a variant that is inherited MATERNAL DNA, one that goes in succession father to son (Y-kromosomalt DNA) and one that is inherited from both his mother as his father (autosomal DNA). By using all these types of DNA study has been more complete.

- It is difficult to work with DNA that are this old. It is easy to analyze archaeologist, or their own DNA by mistake, "says Helena Malmstr?m, PhD student at the Evolutionary Biology department in Uppsala.

She has, however, had access to the latest DNA sequencing technology, which can be used for studies of the Neandertal genome, and she has used this technology to a whole new way. The results are assessed as a solid and completely reliable.

When DNA analysis is now carried out the last puzzle piece in the research project began with grave opening in 2002 thus fallen into place. Historical data, osteologiska results and DNA-analysis will contribute to a very credible link between the tomb of Varnhem and Birger Jarl (died 1266), his second wife Mechtild (died 1288) and his second youngest son Erik (died 1275).

Possibly same haplo as these?

http://dna-forums.org/index.php?showtopic=8313&pid=127666&mode=threaded&start=#entry127666


Jarl meaning in Sweden.

In Sweden, members of medieval royal families, such as the House of Stenkil and House of Bjelbo, held the title of jarl before their ascension to the throne. Since the early 12th century, there usually was only one holder of the title at a time, second only to the King of Sweden.

For special occasions, regional jarls outside of Sweden could be nominated as well. An example of this is Jon jarl, who allegedly conducted pirate operations against Novgorod in the east. When the House of Bjelbo succeeded in becoming the royal family in 1250, the title was subsumed into that of duke and the powers were merged into the kingship soon after Birger jarl's death in 1266.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birger_jarl

Jarls of Sweden

From diverse families:

* Jon Sverkersson, eldest son and heir of king Sverker I of Sweden
* Karl Sverkersson, next son of king Sverker I - jarl in Gothenland
* jarl Ragvald Henriksson, riksjarl during the brief reign of his brother Magnus (II)
* Ulf Jarl, jarl in 1160s
* jarl Guttorm, in 1160s

From the House of Bjelbo:

* Folke the Fat, jarl around 1100
* Bengt Snivil, jarl in the mid-1100s - probably never jarl
* Birger Brosa, 1174-1202[5]
* Johan Sverkersson, 1202-120?[5]
* Jon Jarl, ?-1206?[5]
* Knut Birgersson, 120?-1208[5], killed in 1208 at the Battle of Lena
* Folke Birgersson, 1208-1210[5], killed in 1210 at the Battle of Gestilren
* Charles the Deaf (Karl D?ve), 1210?-1220[5], killed at the Battle of Lihula
* Ulf Fase, 1220?-? and 1231-1240, died 1248[5]
* Birger Magnusson, 1248-1266[5], last jarl (Dux Sweciae)

http://wadbring.com/historia/sidor/birgerj.htm

http://dna-forums.org/index.php?showtopic=3780&pid=48605&mode=threaded&start=#entry48605

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